MONDAY BLUES (06.27.11)

Muddy Waters (Mississippi to Chicago, 1913-1983) performing “Champagne & Reefer” from his final album, King Bee (1981). The song was a standard for Waters during his decades of live performances but for obvious reasons was not pressed onto vinyl, at least not until his collaboration with Johnny Winter (who produced the legend’s final three albums).

Monday Blues (01.24.11)

The great Muddy Waters, with Sonny Boy Williamson on the harp, singing his signature tune, from the American Folk Blues Festival tour (1963).

Monday Blues (01.03.11)

Happy New Year! I wanted to kick this year off by thanking each of every one of you for your support of Latino Like Me. Whether you visit my blog on a regular basis, or subscribe, or just stumble upon here from time to time, I appreciate your time and consideration. I hope from time to time I fill it with a little something entertaining, maybe even thought-provoking.

I’m feeling like I’m going to keep on going with my “Monday Blues” feature, if for no other reason than it’s a good way for me to kick off my work week.

To inaugurate 2011, we return to Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thorton, the mistress of blues who kicked this feature off for us last year. This time she’s singing “I’m Feelin’ Alright” from her 1966 album “Big Mama Thorton with the Muddy Waters Blues Band.”

Monday Blues

Here’s one to bring in the New Year…

Monday Blues

Keb’ Mo’ (Los Angeles, 1951-) performing “I Can’t Be Satisfied” and “Two Trains Running” (originally by Muddy Waters, from a special devoted in tribute to him).

I’m not sure what kind of props Keb’ Mo’ gets in the blues world. It sometimes seems he’s more popular with the PBS/NPR white folk crowd than the more blue-centric/”purist” folk out there. I have often wondered how much of that comes from the fact that he isn’t from the South or from Chicago or any other place in the nation with a clear blues legacy. To those who would deride him, I’d say he can more “authentically” represent the foundation of those blues than an Eric Clapton or other Englishman (who don’t get the same push back from the purists) ever could, even when he creates these hybrid “retro meets new generation” blues works.

As a little teaser, this clip ends with Bo Diddley doing Muddy’s “I’m A Man.”