On the radio

I recently did a radio interview with KPFA, the Berkeley-based flagship station of the Pacifica Radio Network. We talked about my book, Latinos at the Golden Gate.

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My interview will be edited and aired at an upcoming date on the morning show UpFront. I’m not sure I’ll know in advance of it actual airing, so I’ll be sure and post a link when the segment is posted on their site.

The timing is fortuitous since Latinos at the Golden Gate is scheduled to be released in paperback in early 2016.

More on that when I know more…

History is not the past…

A friend of mine made this a short video from a talk I gave in San Francisco last fall. The talk was about my book on the history of Latinos in the city–Latinos at the Golden Gate–but, as you can see, it was also about some of the present struggle Latino communities are facing.

My “book tour”

I’ll be in the Bay Area this week to talk about my book, Latinos at the Golden Gate. It’s the first of four trips I’m making to the city to share my work and sign some books for those who are interested. It’s also my first trip back since the book came out.

This week I’ll be giving two informal talks on the book, covering the history of Latina/o community in San Francisco from the Gold Rush to the 1970s. I’d love to see you there if you can make it!

Wednesday, January 15 @ 7:30PM
I’m the first spring 2014 public talk event sponsored by Shaping SF. My talk will be at the Eric Quezada Center, in the heart of the Mission District, at 518 Valencia. The event is free and open to the public. For more info you can visit their website.

Thursday, January 16 @ 7:00PM
I’m also speaking in Berkeley, at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (2521 Channing Way). This event is part of the California Studies Dinner Seminar series. The dinner and discussion are both free (although they ask for a small donation for drinks) but an RSVP is required. You can find out the details by visiting their website.

I don’t think they’ll be selling books at either event but if you bring a copy I’d be happy to sign it!

Hope to see you this week!

“Out of Many, Uno”

A piece I wrote was released today on the University of North Carolina Press (UNC) Blog.

In “Out of Many, Uno,” I draw some connections between the history of Latinos in San Francisco–the story of my book, Latinos at the Golden Gate (published by UNC Press)–and the larger, unfolding story of the 21st century United States.

While the political emergence of Latinos surprised many in the mainstream media, it’s been a closely watched process for those who study the nation’s second-largest racial/ethnic group. Mexican American and Puerto Rican voters have played decisive roles in particular local elections for generations. And, for the last decade, in a handful of states that have traditionally served as “gateways” for Latin American migrants to the United States—California, Texas, New York, and Florida in particular—a statewide candidate who ignores Latino voters does so at their own peril.

These local and regional patterns are now playing out at a national level. On a near daily basis we are peppered with evidence that the political establishment is refocusing its future efforts on attracting more Latino voters. In addition to tailoring their messages to Latino audiences (like this 2011 DNC video for the Obama campaign), they are also increasingly concerned about their image among Latino voters. As one conservative put it: “You can’t call someone ugly and expect them to go to the prom with you.”

As with most “new” things, however, the mainstream United States still has a lot to learn about this growing segment of its population. Perhaps the most common misconception that remains, even in this period of increasing attention, is the belief that there is naturally such as thing as a “Latino.”

To read the entire piece, visit the UNC Press Blog.

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