Friday Five: 70s mixed tape

Let’s pop in a tape and go for a ride…

5. “D’yer Mak’er” by Led Zeppelin (1973)

4. “Dance, Dance, Dance” by Steve Miller Band (1976)

3. “Domino” by Van Morrison (1970)

2. “Peg” by Steely Dan (1977)

1. “My Sharona” by The Knack (1979)

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Friday Five: 80’s dance

Here’s part 3 of my homage to 80s R&B, my selection of some of the best dance hits of the decade:

5. “Let the Music Play” by Shannon (1983)
Too much 80s here but it’s all the right kind.

4. “Lovergirl” by Teena Marie (1984)
The soulful Teena Marie.

3. “Come Go With Me” by Exposé (1987)
I had a high school, lunchtime conversation once where we debated which member of Exposé was the sexiest.

2. “Don’t You Want Me” by Jody Watley (1987)
Her music had so many of the elements of 80s club tracks that they don’t get played much today. At the foundation, though, they were good beats from a great performer.

1. “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” by Whitney Houston (1987)
This is one of my favorite songs of all-time. My kids have been instructed to play it at my funeral.

Friday Five: R&B in 1986

I finished 8th grade in 1986 and started high school. That meant going from a fairly homogenous (Mexican American) 1st through 8th elementary school of a bit more than 200 to a very diverse (by race and class) school of more than 1700. This was my soundtrack for that change.

5. “The Rain” by Oran “Juice” Jones
Aside from the really long monologue at the end of the song, the claim to fame for this one hit wonder is that it’s the first #1 song for the Def Jam label.

4. “Rumors” by Timex Social Club
If I had a personal soundtrack for the summer of 1986, it could have this song on it and be done. The dad of a grade school friend gave me a lift home that summer and he sang along with the song when it came on the radio. In my mind he was instantly and forever the coolest dad ever.

3. “All Cried Out” by Lisa Lisa and the Cult Jame (with Full Force)
It’s early fall 1986 and a big group of our freshmen class (boys and girls) are building and decorating our class float for homecoming. This song comes on a boom box and it becomes a mass sing-a-long, girls singing Lisa Lisa’s parts and boys becoming Full Force.

2. “Word Up!” by Cameo
This is a good song. It has a great beat and an assortment of interesting sounds. But it’s Larry Blackmon’s odd phrasing and outfits that made this the memorable treat that it is.

1. “Nasty” by Janet Jackson
No my first name ain’t baby / It’s Janet / Miss Jackson if you’re nasty.

Friday Five: Na Na Na Na

The kids and I were on our way to school this week when we heard “Land of a Thousand Dances” by Wilson Pickett. It’s a great song and an even better performance by the music legend. It reminds me of one of my favorite live performances, which is from the legendary film Soul to Soul, a documentary capturing Pickett and others playing in Accra, Ghana in 1971.

I immediately described it to the kiddos. Here it is, for your viewing pleasure. In it, Pickett preaches the power of soul and R&B to a receptive crowd of Ghanaian youth:

“Land of a Thousand Dances” is most famous for its hook, the “na na na na” refrain originally added to the song by the great Chicano band Cannibal and the Headhunters. (Here’s their classic version from 1965. (And while we’re at it, here’s the cover by the equally legendary Chicano group Thee Midniters, released the same year.))

That simple two-letter utterance, sung again and again, is the inspiration for this week’s five songs. It’s a hard list to make. There are a lot of songs spanning the decades that have used a refrain of “na na na na.” So here it goes…

5. “I’ll Be Your Shelter” by Taylor Dayne (1989)
This is probably the least known song of my selected bunch, but it’s one that stands out for me in the “na na” category. Close to thirty years ago, I was driving back from the beach with my good friend Patrick when this song came on the radio. I remember him liking it so much because of the catchy use of the refrain; I also remember we talked about other songs that used it. It’s only right that it be on the list. While it’s a forgotten song by an artist that only had a few hits, and while it’s massively late-80s-pop sounding (which is not a good thing), it’s got a lot going for it, not the least of which is the talented Dayne at the helm.

4. “All the Small Things” by blink 182 (1999)
I remember blink 182’s ascendency in the late 90s. They felt and sounded like a watered down version of Green Day, almost like they were manufactured for the times. They were a solid MTV favorite that year, one I didn’t think much of until I saw the below video for this song (funny, especially since they’re mocking the boys band MT culture when they were courting the rock end of that same pop spectrum) and until the song started playing everywhere. It was catchy, I’ll give them that.

3. “Hey Jude” by the Beatles (1968)
This is the most famous “na na na na” song. I remember playing my parent’s copy of the album of singles by The Beatles, which is the only record we had with it. I was a sophomore or junior in high school at the time and I just played this song over and over, even counting the number of “na na na” refrains they used (I think it was 27). Here’s the version from the song’s premiere, on David Frost’s “Frost on Saturday.” The vocals are live but the band is playing to previously recorded music.

2. Gettin’ Jiggy wit it” by Will Smith (1997)
Big Willie Style was Will Smith’s first solo album, and his first recordings after he became a major movie star. He hit it big with the album, mostly on the tails of this 1998 hit. It made the word “jiggy” part of the mainstream, too, although I’m not sure most people knew how to use the word.

1. “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” by Steam (1969)
This has to be on the top of the heap because it has the key words in its title! So synonymous with the “na na” refrain, it’s often called the “Na Na Song.” It’s also the tune crowds will sing when somebody we don’t like is being kicked off the stage, the field, or some other venue. It’s a pop culture classic, and a pretty good tune, too. It’s also a throw together song of previously recorded tracks and filler lyrics, a classic unintentional number 1 song.

Friday Five: Steve Earle

I was listening to some Townes Van Zandt this week, which usually leads to listening to Steve Earle.  As I did, I discovered Earle’s most recent album, So You Wannabe An Outlaw, released last summer.  I fell in love with a couple of the songs and thought he deserved a little spotlight here.

5. “Copperhead Road” (1988)
His most well-known song, so to speak, this single was the title track off his third album, a critically-acclaimed fusion of rock and bluegrass.

4. “The Devil’s Right Hand” (1988)
My favorite song off Copperhead Road, and the first song I ever heard by Steve Earle. The version below is a touch different than the album version, but it really captures the Van Zandt influence in him.

3. “Sometime She Forgets” (1995)
Earle is a drug addict, and this song is from his first album after getting clean, Train A Commin’. It’s folk, bluegrass, country goodness, made all the better by the inclusion of Emmylou Harris and a few other folks who joined him for the album.

2. “This City” (2011)
Earle played a role in David Simon’s short-lived HBO series Tremé. This song closed out the first season. Earle tells the story a bit in the below performance.

1. “Goodbye Michaelangelo” (2017)
This is the song I couldn’t get enough of this week. It’s from the album So You Wannabe An Outlaw, which is billed to Steve Earle & the Dukes. The album harkens back to the Highwaymen and the kind of post-60s music made by Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, and others. This song is beautifully recorded on a 1939 Martin D-28 guitar, something Earle explains in this other video.

Friday Five: On the Road

It’s spring break for my kids and that means la familia Summers Sandoval is hitting the road!

We’re off to the Grand Canyon, with side trips to Sedona and (maybe) the Hoover Dam, so there’s not much time to write.  Instead, here’s five songs in honor of our journey, each linked to a live performance.

5. “Highway to Hell”  by AC/DC (1979)

4. “Hit the Road Jack” by Ray Charles (1961) 

3. “Thunder Road” by Bruce Springsteen (1975)

2. “Life is a Highway” by Tom Cochrane (1991)

1. “Crossroads” by Cream (1966)

 

Friday Five: The Big Lebowski

The Big Lebowski came out 20 years ago this month.

At that time in my life, I was going to a lot of movies.  I was ABD (done with my graduate courses, exams, and left with “all but dissertation” before the PhD) and I lived in Oakland, mere blocks away from two really good theaters (the Piedmont and the Grand Lake).  I’d often go for a walk, pass by one of the two, and buy a ticket to see just about anything that happened to be playing.

I don’t remember if I planned to see The Big Lebowski or if it was one of those spontaneous things.  I do remember that I pretty much thought it was a work of genius. Cheech and Chong’s Up In Smoke (1978) invented the stoner genre–circular narrative which ends up being about nothing, filled with odd characters, some of who get high and/or are trying to get high.  The Big Lebowski gave us the big budget, high production, epically operatic version of the form.

The Coen Brothers use of music was a standout feature of the movie for me, so much so that I bought the soundtrack that same day.   The CD remains one of my favorite soundtracks of all time. It introduced me to a whole bunch of songs that I had never heard before and ended up loving to this day.  There were some amazingly great records (“The Man in Me” and “Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)”); two great covers (one by the Gypsy Kings and one by Townes Van Zandt); and a classic tune sung by the great Nina Simone.  It even had a German opera duet (“Gluck Das Mir Verblieb”), which was undoubtedly the first of that genre I ever heard.

So here’s my five favorite tracks from The Big Lebowski Original Motion Picture Soundtrack:

5. “Hotel California” by the Gypsy Kings
I knew no more than one song by the Gypsy Kings.  I knew more than one by the Eagles. I never knew the two became one until this.

4. “Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In) by The First Edition
As a child of the 80s, Kenny Rogers was a known entity for me.  Even though we didn’t listen to country, he had a good deal of crossover “pop” appeal to make him more than familiar.  What I didn’t know until 20 years ago was just how serpentine his path to being country legend was, including as it did a stop in psychedelic rock.  (Nor did I know that the band had character actor Mickey Jones on drums!)

3. “Dead Flowers” by Townes Van Zandt
I had heard of Townes Van Zandt by 1998, mostly in relation to Steve Earle, whom I admired since I heard his album Copperhead Road.  As far as I can remember, this was the first time I heard Townes sing.  I bought his Live at the Old Quarter, Houston, Texas shortly after.

2. “The Man in Me” by Bob Dylan
I’ve never been a huge Dylan fan.  What I did know (and respect, and often like) went up to Blonde on Blonde.  Between Lebowski and The Hurricane (1999) I started to really prefer some of his 70s work over the rest.

1. “I Got It Bad (and That Ain’t Good)” by Nina Simone
I love Nina Simone. In the pre-all-music-on-the-internet days, her long and eclectic career meant a constant stream of amazing discoveries for me. They often came to my attention in the most random of ways–an essay on the civil rights movement, a documentary on the assassination of Dr. King, or (in this case) a stoner movie.